When J came to us he had limited work experience aside from a short stint in MacDonalds.
Click here to find out more.

When J came to us he had limited work experience aside from a short stint in MacDonalds.
Click here to find out more.

Issues We Work With – Employment

Helping people to overcome barriers and realise their ambitions.
Click here to find out further information on our work in this area.

Helping people into sustainable employment

Although statutory services helping people into employment exist, they are not always able to work effectively with people who have added barriers such as an offending background, a history of homelessness, lack of work experience and skills, substance misuse and/or mental health problems.  This is where our services come in.  They work with people at their own pace and offer additional help with issues which may be holding someone back from finding and holding down a job.

  • In 2018/19, we helped 1050 people into paid jobs and 90% were full time.
  • During the same year, we helped 509 young people into apprenticeships.

Our teams work in partnership with statutory services such as Job Centre Plus and employers to source opportunities for their clients.  Specialist support is available for young people who are experiencing barriers to employment.


Our work through these services also helps people experiencing in work poverty which can also have an extremely detrimental effect on individuals and families, with people struggling to hold down insecure employment working long hours on low pay.

  • According to the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, eight million people live in poverty in families where at least one person is in work.
  • In 2016, just one in five people (22%) leaving prison and referred to the Work Programme found a job which they held for six months or more.
  • The Joseph Rowntree Foundation estimate that although the introduction of Universal Credit will help working families in poverty, it will increase the number of families in out-of-work poverty.
  • Young people, aged 16 to 24, are almost three times as likely to be unemployed as all other age groups combined. Disadvantaged young people, such as those who have experienced homelessness are particularly likely to be unemployed (IES Report for Centrepoint)